Tag: frictionless

It’s now possible to share anything from anywhere.

Apple’s latest iphone software builds facebook and twitter sharing right into the core of the phone. Newpaper websites encourage button clicking and story sharing. There are even waste bins that upload pictures to Facebook to encourage recycling.

This is known as frictionless sharing, where anything that could prevent you posting your thoughts, location and pictures of kittens is eliminated. Of course, the point of this is to cause an increase in the amount of data that is transmitted stored about you. This data is valuable both to the mobile phone companies that charge you using it, and for the social web companies who want to provide advertisers with exact profiles about their users. And, of course, it’s a bonus for those consumers among us who want to post those pictures from that night out or that holiday without having to think too much about what they’re doing.

But what does it mean for businesses?

It goes without saying that businesses engaging on the social web all have strict policies in place, that they’re working to an editorial plan for content creation, and are scheduling posts to reach the audience when they are at their most engaged. (If you’re not, you’d better get in touch)

However, because of all this frictionless sharing from your audience and their peers, your carefully planned updates are in danger of simply sliding on by. Like  the beer bottles slung down bar tops in comedy western movies, they’ll keep skidding on until they crash to the floor, but without the hilarious consequences.

There are three possible solutions.

First, increase the amount of time you and your colleagues spend creating useful and interesting content. Just keep hammering out the updates in the vain hope that some will be seen.

Second, increase the repetition. Simply repost the information you want people to see two, three or four times per day.

Third, work even harder to make your updates even more relevant and even more shareable.

Of all of these, the third is the best option. Although the first two would not be defined as spam in the strict sense, they feel spammy and that’s probably worse.

Remember that nobody is here to hand you a living wage. If you want to cut through the noise, you have to sing your song with clarity. The only real way to make your updates sticky enough to attract a big audience is to make them so interesting that they get lots of shares, RTs and reposts.

Understand that not every post is going to garner a wide audience, but believe in what you are doing. Many of the beer bottles will hit the floor. It doesn’t matter Just make sure you’re slinging the best suds in town.